Monthly Archives: January 2013

Michael Gove Ends the Dreams of Thousands – The Historical Association

Michael Gove Ends the Dreams of Thousands - The Historical Association

I try not to be overtly political on this blog (plenty of space for that on www.podesta.org.uk).  But, the condemnation by the History Association of Mr Gove’s move to end AS levels and return to a two year linear A-level has inspired me to re-post this – Michael Gove Ends the Dreams of Thousands – The Historical Association.

Steve Mastin speaks in the Telegraph about making history compulsory.

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/secondaryeducation/9821262/History-lessons-should-be-compulsory.html 

Steve Mastin talks a great deal of sense in this article about the lack of a golden age in history teaching, and the fact that 30% take up of GCSE history is actually quite impressive in a crowded options market.

Previously I have not been convinced that compulsory GCSE in history should be imposed on schools, but I’m willing to be persuaded that it is a good idea.  The main stumbling block, and one which Steve does not tackle in his interview, is the lack of curriculum time and of good quality, well trained history teachers.

The increasing numbers of schools turning to two year KS3 courses, and pushing history to the margins of these curricula, or becoming academies (which are far more likely not to offer GCSE history at all), and the destruction of the PGCE system in this country will make imposing a compulsory GCSE very hard to implement.

Helping Year 7 put some flesh on Roman bones – The Historical Association

Shameless showing off.  Really pleased that my article Helping Year 7 put some flesh on Roman bones – The Historical Association, was published in last month’s Teaching History.

You need to be a HA member to download the whole thing, but if you don’t tell anyone, you can read it here.

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Historical fiction in the classroom – blog

I have just bumped into Historical fiction in the classroom by Dave Martin @davemartin46.  It’s a great site, with a very wide range of books covered, both in terms of topic and age range.

Dave has also had a book published on The French Revolution (Enquiring History Series), the same series for which I’m currently striving to write a book on Italian Unification with Pam Canning, a colleague at LHS.  I got an advance copy last week, and it looks really good – very engaging, but also challenging.

The trench talk that is now entrenched in the English language – Telegraph

I saw this the other day – The trench talk that is now entrenched in the English language – Telegraph – and wondered whether there was a lesson in it.  This absolutely fascinating article talks about how the language of the Trenches has been absorbed into our everyday speech.

It started me off on a bit of an internet wander, and led me to this piece – http://www.firstworldwar.com/features/slang.htm at FirstWorldWar.com, which gives some fascinating vignettes, like the fact that for the Germans, front line soldiers were Frontschwein, “front-pigs”, whilst for the French they were poilu – “hairy beasts”.

There’s even a book, apparently – Trench Talk: Words of the First World War.

British Propaganda during the Second World War

radioYou can now find a series of lessons that I’ve been teaching about British propaganda during the Second World War on this site.  These might be adaptable in the future to help tick off many of those on the list of the great and the good that we might be asked to cover under the new Hirschean National Curriculum!!